Though statins have helped reduce blood cholesterol levels for millions of Americans, little was known about how Hispanics respond to this type of drug therapy due to the fact this community has generally been underrepresented in clinical trials.

A new study named STARSHIP (STudy Assessing Rosuvastatin in HIspanic Population) was presented at the National Hispanic Medical Association (NHMA) annual meeting. STARSHIP is the first-ever large-scale, prospective trial exclusively designed to compare the effects of statins in Hispanic patients.

STARSHIP evaluated the efficacy of AstraZeneca's CRESTOR, a statin used to treat high cholesterol, compared to atorvastatin. It found that CRESTOR in 10 and 20 mg doses helped to reduce LDL cholesterol (or "bad" cholesterol) by 45.2 and 50 percent, vs. 35.9 and 42.4 percent for similar doses of atorvastatin (p<0.017). In Hispanic patients, CRESTOR reduced total blood cholesterol levels by 32.4 and 34.9 percent compared to 25.6 and 30.9 percent for atorvastatin (p<0.017).

Though statins have helped reduce blood cholesterol levels for millions of Americans, little was known about how Hispanics respond to this type of drug therapy due to the fact this community has generally been underrepresented in clinical trials.

A new study named STARSHIP (STudy Assessing Rosuvastatin in HIspanic Population) was presented at the National Hispanic Medical Association (NHMA) annual meeting. STARSHIP is the first-ever large-scale, prospective trial exclusively designed to compare the effects of statins in Hispanic patients.

STARSHIP evaluated the efficacy of AstraZeneca's CRESTOR, a statin used to treat high cholesterol, compared to atorvastatin. It found that CRESTOR in 10 and 20 mg doses helped to reduce LDL cholesterol (or "bad" cholesterol) by 45.2 and 50 percent, vs. 35.9 and 42.4 percent for similar doses of atorvastatin (p<0.017). In Hispanic patients, CRESTOR reduced total blood cholesterol levels by 32.4 and 34.9 percent compared to 25.6 and 30.9 percent for atorvastatin (p<0.017).

Six hundred ninety-six Hispanic patients with elevated cholesterol levels participated in the one-of-a-kind study conducted by Dr. Ramon Lloret, president of the Cardiovascular Center of South Florida in Miami. "As a Latino and physician who treats our community - which is traditionally underserved - I see firsthand the importance of this study. The STARSHIP trial represents a great opportunity to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of statins in this population." Said Dr. Lloret. "STARSHIP is the first trial to demonstrate significantly greater efficacy in lowering LDL-cholesterol in Hispanic patients using milligram equivalent doses of CRESTOR compared to atorvastatin,"

About CRESTOR

CRESTOR (rosuvastatin calcium) is a once-daily prescription medication for use as an adjunct to diet in the treatment of various lipid disorders including primary hypercholesterolemia, mixed dyslipidemia and isolated hypertriglyceridemia. It is a member of the statin (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) class of drug therapy. CRESTOR has not been determined to prevent heart disease, heart attacks, or strokes. For patients with hypercholesterolemia and mixed dyslipidemia, the usual recommended starting dose of CRESTOR is 10 mg. However, initiation of therapy with 5 mg once daily should be considered for patients requiring less aggressive LDL-C reductions or who have predisposing factors for myopathy, and for special populations such as patients taking cyclosporine, Asian patients, and patients with severe renal insufficiency. For patients with marked hypercholesterolemia (LDL-C >190 mg/dL) and aggressive lipid targets, a 20-mg starting dose may be considered. AstraZeneca licensedworldwide rights to CRESTOR from the Japanese pharmaceutical company Shionogi & Co., Ltd.

To obtain complete prescription information for CRESTOR or on the products in the STARSHIP cholesterol study, visit Crestor.com or call AstraZeneca's Information Center at 1-800-236-9933.

Hispanics and High Cholesterol

-- Almost 17 percent of Hispanic men - and nearly 14 percent of Hispanic women- have total blood cholesterol levels over 240 mg/dl
-- Hispanics are 36 percent less likely than Caucasians to have properly controlled cholesterol.

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